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Articles

Geroge & John   A Christmas Message

Employee Christmas Parties and Gifts – Any FBT?
Salary Sacrifice - An introduction
8 Financial Tips For Young Adults
Merry Christmas and Happy New Year
George's & John's Desk - October - November Newsletter
Age Pensions
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Tips For Buying The Perfect Investment Property

George & John August 2010 Newsletter

8 Financial Tips For Young Adults
By Amy Fontinelle | Investopedia.com
CompareShares.com.au  / www.thebull.com.au

(Note:  there are Financial Tools / Calculators on this site that’ll help you implement some of the following ideas)

Unfortunately, personal finance has not yet become a required subject in high school or college, so you might be fairly clueless about how to manage your money when you're out in the real world for the first time. If you think that understanding personal finance is way above your head, though, you're wrong. All it takes to get started on the right path is the willingness to do a little reading - you don't even need to be particularly good at maths.

To help you get started, we'll take a look at eight of the most important things to understand about money if you want to live a comfortable and prosperous life.

Learn Self Control
If you're lucky, your parents taught you this skill when you were a kid. If not, keep in mind that the sooner you learn the fine art of delaying gratification, the sooner you'll find it easy to keep your finances in order. Although you can effortlessly purchase an item on credit the minute you want it, it's better to wait until you've actually saved up the money. Do you really want to pay interest on a pair of jeans or a box of cereal?

If you make a habit of putting all your purchases on credit cards, regardless of whether you can pay your bill in full at the end of the month, you might still be paying for those items in 10 years. If you want to keep your credit cards for the convenience factor or the rewards they offer, make sure to always pay your balance in full when the bill arrives, and don't carry more cards than you can keep track of.

Take Control of Your Own Financial Future
If you don't learn to manage your own money, other people will find ways to (mis)manage it for you. Some of these people may be ill-intentioned. Others may be well-meaning, but may not know what they're doing.

Instead of relying on others for advice, take charge and read a few basic books on personal finance. Once you're armed with personal finance knowledge, don't let anyone catch you off guard - whether it's a significant other or friends who want you to go out and blow tons of money with them every weekend. Understanding how money works is the first step toward making your money work for you. (NB: To help here test out the Budget tools by clicking on the Financial Tools / Calculator button)

Know Where Your Money Goes
Once you've gone through a few personal finance books, you'll realize how important it is to make sure your expenses aren't exceeding your income. The best way to do this is by budgeting. Once you see how your morning java adds up over the course of a month, you'll realize that making small, manageable changes in your everyday expenses can have just as big of an impact on your financial situation as getting a raise. In addition, keeping your recurring monthly expenses as low as possible will also save you big bucks over time. If you don't waste your money on a posh apartment now, you might be able to afford a nice Unit or a house before you know it.  (NB: To help here test out the Budget tools by clicking on the Financial Tools / Calculator button)


Start an Emergency Fund
One of personal finance's oft-repeated mantras is "pay yourself first". No matter how much you owe in student loans or credit card debt and no matter how low your salary may seem, it's wise to find some amount - any amount - of money in your budget to save in an emergency fund every month.

Having money in savings to use for emergencies can really keep you out of trouble financially and help you sleep better at night. Also, if you get into the habit of saving money and treating it as a non-negotiable monthly "expense", pretty soon you'll have more than just emergency money saved up: you'll have retirement money, vacation money and even money for a home down payment.

Don't just sock away this money under your mattress, put it in, for example, a high-interest savings account. Otherwise, inflation will erode the value of your savings.

Start Saving for Retirement Now
Just as you headed off to kindergarten with your parents' hope to prepare you for success in a world that seemed eons away, you need to prepare for your retirement well in advance. Because of the way compound interest works, the sooner you start saving, the less principal you'll have to invest to end up with the amount you need to retire, and the sooner you'll be able to call working an "option" rather than a "necessity".  (NB: To help here test out the Super tools by clicking on the Financial Tools / Calculator button)

Get a Grip on Taxes
It's important to understand how income taxes work even before you get your first pay. When a company offers you a starting salary, you need to know how to calculate whether that salary will give you enough money after taxes to meet your financial goals and obligations. Fortunately, there are online calculators that have taken the dirty work out of determining your own payroll taxes. These calculators will show you your gross pay, how much goes to taxes and how much you'll be left with, which is also known as net, or take-home pay.

Guard Your Health
If meeting monthly health insurance premiums seems impossible, what will you do if you have to go to the emergency room, where a single visit for a minor injury like a broken bone can be costly? If you're uninsured, don't wait another day to apply for health insurance; it's easier than you think to wind up in a car accident or trip down the stairs. You can save money by getting quotes from different insurance providers to find the lowest rates. Also, by taking daily steps now to keep yourself healthy, maintaining a healthy weight, exercising, not smoking, not consuming alcohol in excess, and even driving defensively, you'll thank yourself down the road when you aren't paying exorbitant medical bills.

Guard Your Wealth
If you want to make sure that all of your hard-earned money doesn't vanish, you'll need to take steps to protect it. If you rent, get insurance to protect the contents of your place from events like burglary or fire. Disability insurance protects your greatest asset - the ability to earn an income - by providing you with a steady income if you ever become unable to work for an extended period of time due to illness or injury.



13th-December-2010